Pacific Gas & Electric is looking for citizen volunteers to serve on the Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel, and interested people have until mid-April to apply.

There are five positions open on the 11-member panel of citizens and the application deadline is April 10. Apply online at: www.diablocanyonpanel.org or at: www.pge.com/engagementpanel.

“We are strongly focused on the safe and reliable operation of Diablo Canyon,” Jim Welsch, Senior Vice President of Generation and Chief Nuclear Officer said, “and at the same time, are planning for a safe and responsible decommissioning of the facility to begin after the operating licenses expire in 2024 and 2025. “We greatly appreciate the panel’s efforts and the work they have been doing over the past few years to provide meaningful and constructive feedback that has helped to shape PG&E’s decommissioning strategies. We strongly encourage members of our community to submit applications to join the panel so that PG&E and this project can continue to benefit from a wide range of insights.”

Company reps and panel members will fill the open seats from the applications received and announce the selections by May 1.

According to PG&E, the Decommissioning Engagement Panel “was created to foster open and frequent dialogue between members of the local community and PG&E on matters related to DCPP decommissioning. Panelists are local community members from across San Luis Obispo County who were selected to broadly represent diverse community viewpoints.”

The panel doesn’t have a rigorous meeting schedule but meets periodically on matters related to the plant’s decommissioning and the future use of the extensive coastal lands and facilities.

The land surrounding the power plant stretches from Avila Beach to Montaña de Oro State Park. It includes some of the most pristine coastal scrublands, oak woodlands, coastal bluffs and foothills left in California and abuts the State Park. The press is on to have the entire property conserved as wilderness or possibly turned over to the local Chumash, the historical inhabitants of the area.

The economic impact of Diablo Canyon’s ultimate closure and retirement, due in 2024 and 2025 for its two power units, is among the looming economic unknowns for San Luis Obispo County, and the San Luis Coastal Unified School District of SLO, Los Osos, Morro Bay and Avila Beach, and the expected loss of property taxes when the plant is shuttered and the property devalued.

The dismantling of the plant is expected to take many years and cost several billion dollars, leaving much time to decide its future uses.

“We greatly appreciate the panel’s efforts and the work they have been doing over the past few years to provide meaningful and constructive feedback that has helped to shape PG&E’s decommissioning strategies. We strongly encourage members of our community to submit applications to join the panel so that PG&E and this project can continue to benefit from a wide range of insights.”

Company reps and panel members will fill the open seats from the applications received and announce the selections by May 1.

According to PG&E, the Decommissioning Engagement Panel “was created to foster open and frequent dialogue between members of the local community and PG&E on matters related to DCPP decommissioning. Panelists are local community members from across San Luis Obispo County who were selected to broadly represent diverse community viewpoints.”

The panel doesn’t have a rigorous meeting schedule but meets periodically on matters related to the plant’s decommissioning and the future use of the extensive coastal lands and facilities.

The land surrounding the power plant stretches from Avila Beach to Montaña de Oro State Park. It includes some of the most pristine coastal scrublands, oak woodlands, coastal bluffs and foothills left in California and abuts the State Park. The press is on to have the entire property conserved as wilderness or possibly turned over to the local Chumash, the historical inhabitants of the area.

The economic impact of Diablo Canyon’s ultimate closure and retirement, due in 2024 and 2025 for its two power units, is among the looming economic unknowns for San Luis Obispo County, and the San Luis Coastal Unified School District of SLO, Los Osos, Morro Bay and Avila Beach, and the expected loss of property taxes when the plant is shuttered and the property devalued.

The dismantling of the plant is expected to take many years and cost several billion dollars, leaving much time to decide its future uses.